Last edited by Kagamuro
Monday, July 27, 2020 | History

2 edition of Macassans and Aboriginal smallpox found in the catalog.

Macassans and Aboriginal smallpox

N. G. Butlin

Macassans and Aboriginal smallpox

the "1789" and "1829" epidemics

by N. G. Butlin

  • 319 Want to read
  • 6 Currently reading

Published by Australian National University in Canberra, Australia .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Australia
    • Subjects:
    • Smallpox -- Australia -- Epidemiology.,
    • Aboriginal Australians -- Diseases -- History.

    • Edition Notes

      StatementN.G. Butlin.
      SeriesWorking papers in economic history,, no. 22
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsRA644.S6 B88 1984
      The Physical Object
      Pagination20, 2 p., [1] leaf of plates :
      Number of Pages20
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL2969382M
      LC Control Number84215836

        According to the editors, the essays 'present an interdisciplinary perspective on the maritime journeys of the Macassans, as well as their encounters with Aboriginal communities in the north and the on-going impact this exchange has had on Aboriginal .   (43) Campbell Macknight, 'Macassans and the Aboriginal past', p (44) Judy Campbell, Invisible Invaders, p. 9. (45) D. Hopkins, Princes and Peasants, p. He notes that, 'Indian merchants could have carried it from Rome before the fourth century A. D. Arab traders had dealings with the islands by the seventh century, as did the Chinese.

      Aboriginal Australians--Australia, Northern--Foreign inluences. Macassans were among the irst foreigners they had ever come across, provoking since been published in the classic book in. First Fleet smallpox Recent scholars, Christopher Warren (), Craig Mear (), and Michael Bennett () have argued that the First Fleet probably introduced live smallpox virus into Australian aboriginal tribes. Earlier writers were divided over 1) whether the First Fleet introduced smallpox and 2) whether this was deliberate.

      The history of smallpox extends into pre-history; the disease likely emerged in human populations ab BC. [1] The earliest credible evidence of smallpox is found in the Egyptian mummies of people who died some years ago. [2] During the 18th century the disease killed an estimated , Europeans each year, including five reigning monarchs, and was responsible for a third of all. Description: Darwin: Nungalinya Publications, 52 p.: ill., map ; 28 cm. ISBN: Summary: Groote Eylandt visit; Contacts between Aborigines (Warnindilyaugwa) & Macassans; Macassan sites; rock painting sites at Chasm Island, Dalimba Bay, Marnggala Cave and Angurugu; Sacred sites and myths associated with them - includes Bickerton Island; Missions of C.M.S. at .


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Macassans and Aboriginal smallpox by N. G. Butlin Download PDF EPUB FB2

The creature and the food product are commonly known in English as sea cucumber, bêche-de-mer in French, gamat in Malay, while Makassarese has 12 terms covering 16 different species. One of the Makassar terms, for trepang, taripaŋ, entered the Aboriginal languages of the Cobourg Peninsula, as tharriba in Marrku, as jarripang in Mawng or otherwise as darriba.Macassans and Aboriginal smallpox: the '' and '' epidemics / N.G.

Butlin Australian National University Canberra, Australia Wikipedia Citation Please see Wikipedia's template documentation for further citation fields that may be required. Ian Gilligan, Clothing and Climate in Aboriginal Australia, Current Anthropology, /, 49, 3, (), ().

Crossref Anne Clarke, Ursula Frederick, Closing the Distance: Interpreting Cross‐Cultural Engagements Through Indigenous Rock Art, Archaeology of Oceania: Australia and the Pacific Islands, /, ( Cited by: Smallpox History War The arrival of smallpox in Australia is of uncertain origin.

The lack of immunity among Aboriginal Australians to this introduced disease saw it inflict a devastating toll on the Aboriginal population. Though the First Fleet itself did not arrive with any known carriers of the disease, the observation of an epidemic. Bark painting depicting Macassans boiling down trepang by Mathaman Marika, Yirrkala, is one of seven bark paintings that appear on Davidson's collection list under the heading 'Bark paintings – Macassan Prau – Yirritja and Dhuwa Moieties'.

The following explanation comprises two parts: a general account that precedes the. Book Reviews Invisible invaders, smallpox and other diseases in Aboriginal Australia – by Judy Campbell, pp, Melbourne University Press, Melbourne$ Judy Campbell’s Invisible invaders is a polished gem of historical research.

It is one of those books which are fine to the feel, and its design, from cover to print-size. Macassans and aboriginal smallpox: The ‘’ and ‘’ epidemics.

N.G. Butlin. Historical Studies. Vol - Issue Published online: 29 Sep Article. Smallpox in Aboriginal Australia, – Judy Campbell.

Historical Studies. Vol - Issue Published online: 27 Jan Browse journals by subject. This book presents inter-disciplinary perspectives on the maritime journeys of the Macassan trepangers who sailed in fleets of wooden sailing vessels known as praus from the port city of Makassar in southern Sulawesi to the northern Australian coastline.

These voyages date back to at least the s and there is new evidence to suggest that the Macassan praus were visiting. An ongoing debate connected to the trepang trade is about Aboriginal agency and the extent to which they controlled and directed relations with the Macassans (see Russell ).

An example of this is through negotiating to protect and secure their own interests and the influence this continues to have on contemporary events. An outbreak of smallpox in Sydney in killed thousands of Aborigines and weakened resistance to white settlement. Chris Warren argues that the.

ABC Radio Darwin interviews a local Yirrkala resident Barbara Luk Luk Burrarwanga about the history of Maccasan in Arnhnem Land. Barbara Luk Luk Burarrwanga is a. a very convenient theory- smallpox – boston – sydney – it was the macassans stupid ‘By a strange coincidence, smallpox reached Port Jackson [Sydney Cove] at about the same time as the First ox had decimated the indigenous population probably not brought by the Europeans, as first feared, but possibly introduced.

As most of us will know, in Aprila catastophic epidemic of smallpox swept through local tribes near Port Jackson. This was a time when Aboriginal tribes were actively, and successfully, resisting settlers from the First Fleet. This outbreak was recorded by several First Fleeters, for example David Collins who wrote.

Butlin emphasised scepticism about the historical record as no colonist ever ‘saw’ Aboriginal people in ‘their pre-contact conditions’ because of the long-range ef ect of smallpox and other diseases (, p. In a sense, the main subject of this chapter is the economic prehistory of Aboriginal Australia in the early colonial period.

Macassans visited the same coastal areas year after year, and they would take off into the sunset with the south-east winds in their sails- with the expectation that they would do it all again next year.

Macassans and Aboriginal people both knew what to expect, and where both parties could profit from the interaction, amiable relationships ensued. This article sheds new light on the outbreak of smallpox at Sydney Cove in It draws on local Eora traditions, corroborated by medical and historical sources, as a basis for gaining fresh insights into this event, for reviewing recent literature, and for re-examining several circumstances that could have led to the outbreak.

book. Recent surveys of Australian prehistory have given somewhat less space to Macassans (White and O'Connell ; Flood ). This article addresses the question of the significance of Macassan contact for understanding the Aboriginal past, using espe-cially some information which has only become available in the last few years.

By confirming. Get this from a library. Invisible invaders: smallpox and other diseases in Aboriginal Australia, [Judy Campbell] -- "An epidemic of smallpox among Aboriginal people around the infant colony of Sydney in puzzled the British, for there had been no. The Aboriginal protection bureaucracy in Queensland became a moral arbiter judging requests for permission to marry and focusing on young women and mixed descent children.

For more than 30 years the government department was hamstrung by its definition of "Aboriginal" and "half-caste" in the face of a quickly growing mixed population. Description.

Teaching your students about the early age of exploration can be fun and engaging. Designed to compliment the Year 4 Australian HASS curriculum, this highly engaging mystery unit, including supporting powerpoint, world explorer posters and printable activity sheets, is a great way to engage your students interests in the topic as well as expand their knowledge on the age of.

Books like this provide a trenchant commentary on the theoretical wanderings of historical writing during the last decades of the twentieth century. Is history fiction? ), pp. 19–22; N. G.

Butlin, 'Macassans and Aboriginal smallpox: the "" and "" epidemics', Historical Studies, 21 (), –5.Question: Did Aboriginal people in Australia have any contact with other countries before European contact?

Answer: Yes! The first European contact with the land we now know as Australia is generally held to have been by Dutch explorers in We know how important internal trading relationships and routes were to Indigenous peoples, but people are often not aware that a relationship.Trade continues between Aboriginal people and Macassans until the early s.

First contact between Aboriginal people & Europeans. Earliest recorded contact between Europeans and Aboriginal people – by crew of Dutch ship Dwyflken under Captain Willem Jansz on the western coast of .